vygotsky and bruner

vygotsky and bruner

The “other regulation” views of Lev Vygotsky and of Jerome Bruner are contrasted with Jean Piaget’s self-regulatory model of infant development. Examples of adult behavior in Piaget’s writings and in mother-infant interactions suggest that adults perform behaviors which are analogous to Piaget’s type a and b self-regulation. Data from infant games are provided to illustrate the processes by which mothers regulate the environments for their infants and the consequences of such maternal regulation for infant development.
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In his introduction to the first English translation of Vygotsky’s Thought and Language (1962), Jerome Bruner remarked that “Vygotsky’s conception of development is at the same time a theory of education” (p. v). It is noteworthy that 25 years later, in his Prologue to the English edition of Vygotsky’s Collected Works , Bruner (1987) elaborated on this same central theme of Vygotsky’s work: “When I remarked a quarter century ago that Vygotsky’s view of development was also a theory of education, I did not realize the half of it. In fact, his educational theory is a theory of cultural transmission as well as a theory of development. For ‘education’ implies for Vygotsky not only the development of the individual’s potential, but the historical expression and growth of the human culture from which Man springs” (pp. 1–2).
I am for practicing psychologists, for practical work, and so in the broad sense for boldness and the advance of our branch of science into life.

References:

http://www.cambridge.org/core/books/vygotsky-and-education/introduction/FF48391F0549D104A57F8A6D2E06328E
http://www.curee.co.uk/node/4849